Until yesterday, I had never seen a Wes Anderson film. I don’t know much about the guy, other than he’s a big fan of symmetrical shots. The things you learn at film school.

Rushmore, I’m told, is one of his earlier movies. The story follows Max Fischer, an eccentric student with extracurriculars that are off the charts: play director, debate captain, bee-keeper?? This kid would have his pick of colleges if he wasn’t failing all his classes.

Max’s quest to bring up his grades and avoid expulsion is put on the back-burner when he falls in love. You don’t understand, this girl is incredible, she’s well-read, she’s a dreamer . . . she’s also wildly out of his age range. Meet Rosemary Cross, new first grade teacher at Rushmore Academy. Recently widowed, and all Max hears is “she’s single.”

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Max. Oh Max. He tries so hard to embody that “wise-beyond-his-years” persona, but he’s such a quirky little guy. He’s annoying, but in the incredibly relatable, cringe-worthy way that we all were at fifteen. I have to commend the film’s accuracy.

I wasn’t totally comfortable with the student-teacher romance; at least Max’s feelings were clearly not reciprocated, but still, poor Rosemary. What if the principal got wind of rumors that some twerp was building an aquarium to seduce a teacher? You could’ve gotten her fired, Max.

After Rushmore, I’m definitely adding more Anderson films to my watch list. He has real knack for visual humor. Subtle jokes – blink-and-you’ll-miss-it. I will say though, the last act drags on for quite a bit. There’s just not as much happening compared to the rest of the film, but hey no one’s perfect.

Except Margaret Yang. She’s perfect.

margaret-yang

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